Conference Schedule

Day1: October 1, 2018

Keynote Forum

Biography

Gaetano Ranieri is retired and formerly has been full Professor of Applied Geophysics from the Faculty of Civil, Environmental Engineering and Architecture of the University of Cagliari (Italy). He has been the Director of the 1st International School on Soil and Environment Protection (1988) at Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy), Co-founder of (Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society) (now NSG); Organiser of the first International Meeting on Sustainable Environment in Turin, Italy (1995). His main research topics include gravity, seismic, geo-electric, thermic and electro-magnetic applications to civil, mining, environment, agriculture and archaeology fields. He was the first to apply the geophysical methods to soil remediation, waste disposal, precision farm, monuments and earthquake precursors. In the archaeological field he made some important discoveries such as the Volubilis amphitheatre in Morocco, the continuation of the structures in Pollentia (Spain) and in the wide area of Mont’e Prama in Sardinia. He has led various research team in Europe, Africa and Latin America. He has more than 200 papers, 2 patents and 10 awards to his credit.


Abstract

Sardinia is characterized by unique features which confer on it a charm that few other regions in the world possess. Certainly the most important is the presence of the Nuraghi, clear evidence of an evolved and organized people. Over 7,000 and perhaps as many as 10,000 Nuraghi of different forms and complexity are scattered across Sardinia, dating back to the second millennium BC. They tell of a pragmatic people, expert in building futuristic structures, in hydro-geological research and in territorial planning, on with particular attention also devoted to artistic aspects, and with customs and traditions which are not yet fully understood. A particular example comes from a micro-region called Sinis where the presence of Nuraghi exceeds two per square kilometer and where about 45 years ago a necropolis was discovered, with aligned well-tombs covered with slabs and. A parallel sacred road and giant stone sculptures were also found. After a few days of excavations carried out over a period of five years, the searches were hastily interrupted. Only four years ago the research was resumed by the Universities of Cagliari and Sassari, both geophysical surveys and archaeological digs. The task of finding out what the necropolis was linked to and its extent was made possible with the application of advanced geophysical methods. Above all the use of a multichannel Georadar, but also of aerial photos, thermal surveys from aerostats, rapid electrical survey and 3D ERT allowed us to explore a vast area and therefore to understand the extent and perhaps the meaning of some "digital" structures. Moreover, integration with the data of an aerial laser scanner has enabled us to create a system of visualization of dense geophysical data which enables us to attribute archaeological identity to the anomalies identified. In this way it is now possible to travel within the subsoil to discover the way of life of this almost unknown civilization.

Biography

Paola Puma has completed her MA in Architecture, her PhD in Survey and representation of Architecture and environment and postdoctoral studies in the same field from University of Florence; from 2015 is Associate professor at the Department of Architecture of Florence. She is the coordinator of the research group Digital Cultural Heritage- DigitCH, active in the field of survey and representation of architecture and archaeology. She has published more than 100 books and papers in reputed journals and is serving as an editorial board member of reputed journals. Carries out teaching and research in Bachelors degree of Architecture and the Master degree of Architecture, the Master degree of Primary Teacher Education, the PhD School in "Survey and representation of the built environment”.


Abstract

Framework of the research

The current potentialities of virtual archaeology allow the general public, archaeologists and museum curators to well understand the contexts and somehow retrieve, with modern technologies and languages, the “restoration of archaeology” and the highly imaginative aspect of the reconstructive representation interrupted at the end of the 19th century. Moreover, this kind of promotion of archaeology in all categories of citizens together with the renewal of approaches and languages are the crucial key to attaining cognitive and emotional knowledge through active educational activities.

Subject

Populonia was for centuries a major iron production centre, favoured by its proximity to the sea – being the only Etruscan city with this peculiarity – and by its position in front of the Tuscan archipelago, at the junction of important Mediterranean trade routes. The artifacts investigated in the BARATTI IN 3D PROJECT are the Monumental Necropolis of San Cerbone – extending inland at sea level from the Gulf of Baratti - and several finds excavated from its “tombs of princes” (all the finds are exhibited in the Archaeological Museum of Populonia and in the National Archaeological Museum of Florence).

Methodology

This paper addresses some results of the project, intended to document the tombs and finds in light of their subsequent virtual relocation in order to show, in its entirety, their provenance context. The methodology of the study was constituted by the chain of “data metrical survey - 2D and 3D representation - communication” applied in two different sets of techniques on the tombs and the finds.

Results 

The necropolis consists of approximately 200 remains, of which we have investigated the 30 most important tombs and two sets of their grave goods; the remains have been measured, described in their morphology, size, geometry, material nature and represented in 2D drawings and metrically reliable 3D models; finally, the “match” allowed us to virtually "reproduce” their provenance context.

Conclusions

In addition to digital models, as a physical fallout of this research, a permanent exhibition in the Archaeological Museum of Populonia has been realized, applying electronic engineering to three replicas of the finds, making an innovative approach to the knowledge of archaeology visible and allowing a subsequent rapid expansion of this museum’s audience.

Tracks

  • Methods for Archaeological Investigation | Museums, Heritage and conservation |Analyzing Sociocultural Systems | Archaeology by Period | Applied Anthropology | Artefacts
  • E-Poster Presentation
Location: London,UK

Paola Puma

University of Florence, Italy

Chair

Biography

Abé N’Doumy Noël holds a PhD in Sociology and Health Anthropology (1993) from the University of Abidjan and a Doctorate of State in Human Sciences (2008) from Alassane Ouattara University, Côte d'Ivoire respectively. He is the founder of the Research Laboratory on African Health Thought - Côte d'Ivoire (LARPAS-CI) and the Laboratory for Studies and Research in Reproductive Transition (LERTG). He is the author of several publications in national and international journals.


Abstract

The ethnological approach to health items is defined as an innovative field of investigation in the disciplinary field of health socio-anthropology. This is a site of intense research on all material objects related health problems. The objective of the research is to understand how cultural communities in their history think and interpret various diseases according to their own perceptions and representations from these objects. In this case, the research is applied to the Ivorian ground of West Africa as an experiment. This research field is fundamentally distinct from the field of pharmacopoeia and mystical practices connected to talisman. According ethnocultural areas in Côte d'Ivoire, these health items are varied. Over time, some of these objects have undergone metamorphosis. Others have disappeared under the law of evolution like the loss of animal and plant biodiversity. However, the results indicate four groups of objects. These are the objects in healing power and/or preventive; the symbolic objects of worship; conditionings models of drug products; and technological instruments of preservation, processing or preparation in African medicine. We discover in this classification, cross-functional objects but also specific character to objects. The other observation is that the diseases targeted by these objects are either the same or different passing from one culture to another. The interest and the stake of this research consist in showing another track of collaboration between the two disciplines which are ethnology and archeology. The game challenges include the history of cross-cultural perceptions of health and disease and sustainable development in the field of intangible cultural heritage.

Biography

He graduated from two universities, technical and economic. He worked at senior positions in various fields: the nuclear industry, consulting, agriculture. Now he is the director of Scientific Academy for Research of Social and Psychological Systems. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals. The main field of scientific interests is the theory of systems and its application in various industries.


Abstract

The report presents a version on the goal of an ancient Greek stirrup jar. Stirrup jar is the feature of Mycenaean Greece and so far its precise application has not been known. Most versions assume that the goal of a stirrup jar was an identity recognition. As usually presumed, these vases were used for storing traditional for Hellenic Greece foodstuffs, first of all olive oil. This assumption is also confirmed by the content of small sizes of such vases that were later manufactured in the region. However when Mycenaean civilization flourished marketing value could not be so important. Firstly, it is necessary to search and find a practical value of such events. The report contains the following version - Mycenaean Greece was more livestock region than Hellenic Greece with its crop specialization. Also, livestock specialization of the region could be assumed by its cult features. It is presumed that region main export items frequently consisted of livestock products. For example, nutria fat as most valuable product for North Africa region. Moreover, nutria fat could be kept for a long period of transportation. The report describes a stirrup jar as the vessel that is fits for storing and using nutria fat. Indirect proof that the region was specialized in livestock was shifting livestock production from Greece to the south parts, i.e. in Judea, by the end of Mycenaean period when the climate had been cooled. Storage of the nutria fat in stirrup jars can be easily explained from the practical view point and so it is highly probable that stirrup jar was manufactured for keeping foodstuffs. The presented version apparently is required additional proofs but search of practical purposes of manufacturing these vases can help to understand daily life and logistic of ancient people.  

Biography

David Goodwin pursued his PhD at Otago University, New Zealand comparing persisting land tenure custom between New Zealand Māori and the Shona and Ndebele tribes in Zimbabwe. He lectured at the University of Zimbabwe from 1986 and at the University of Otago since 2007. His research interests include socially-based land tenure in transition, archaeoastronomy, literary cartography and cadastre.


Abstract

In archaeoastronomy, for situations where the azimuths between objects and their relative positions are important but absolute positions can be approximate, only limited options exist for rapid, low-cost and personnel surveys to identify cases that merit in-depth treatment. This presentation describes the field trial of an exploratory survey method that meets the azimuth and relative position criteria. The data set produced is used to test for possible significance in the placing of standing stones at two ancient temples (maraes) in the Society Islands with respect to three hypotheses, namely: the stones line up with voyage destinations or commemorate significant voyages; stones form an analogue “star compass” of directions where significant navigational stars rise and set; and stones line up at a single “freeze-frame” epoch in the significant season of Matariki. The data set proved adequate for eliminating certain possibilities and narrowing the field quickly and inexpensively and is sufficiently rich to be mined in different ways in subsequent research. Only qualified conclusions are possible at this stage, principally because the study has not yet been well enough situated in a cultural context. However, for the Hauviri marae, sufficient encouragement was perhaps given of standing stones serving some astronomical function to warrant further work.

 

Biography

Khalfani Mwamba is a son, husband, brother, grandfather and educator who blends his cultural consciousness, and social justice praxis, for his progressive, professional caring.  From his commitment to creating cross-cultural social work models, he developed http://mindswrite.com/ —the web-hub for Multicultural Reflective Practice in Group Process to promote True Reflection—“the metacognitive focus on a temperamental moment for its meaning which, done repeatedly, brings harmony.”  Mwamba unveiled MindsWrite at his colloquy during the 2017 International Association of Social Workers with Groups (IASWG) symposium at New York’s Silver School of Social Work. Grounded in Narrative and Cybernetic theories, Mwamba aligns his therapeutics with Reflective and Group Dynamics to attune his individual and collective audiences to a greater intimacy with themselves and each other. 

 


Abstract

In this article, I point to shared problems, urging an interprofessional dialogue between Anthropology’s Fieldwork and Social Work’s Group work.  Each struggling with academic redundancy, seem also to suffer from three additional strains: disappearing dyads, where both are losing key interactional elements (ethnography’s native isolate and the latter’s lead savant); lost legitimacy, where both find essentials of their expertise questioned by constituents; and pitfalls of professional harm, where both seem unsure how to maximize protections against their malfeasance.  Importantly, each profession notes that reflection girds resilience and competence.  Yet neither has determined quite how astute perpending may improve Fieldwork and Groupwork hence.  Here I put forth, in firming their FICT of reflection—engagement’s Frequency, Intensity, Complexity and Transparency—specialists may improve each profession’s prospects for 21st C. prominence.

Biography

Leila Hedayatifar is a Recipient of numerous awards and grants including National Science Foundation Award and the International Center for Theoretical Physics Prize. As a Physicist at the New England Complex Systems Institute in the United States, her current research focuses on dynamics of social networks using mathematical and data analysis. Her seminal work has been recognized several times. She has published and presented over 30 articles in highly ranked peer-reviewed journals and conferences. She participated as a Scientific Board and Organizing Committee of several national and international meetings including the International Conference on Complex Systems. She is a Member of American Physical Society and International Complex Systems Society. She is serving as an Editorial and Reviewer of various scientific journals including journal of Big Data and Cognitive Computing, Entropy, and Sustainability.


Abstract

Yesterdays’ friend/enemy rarely become tomorrows’ enemy/friend. Relations do not change easily in presence of memory. In fact, the ability of human beings to remember history of relations develops social concepts such as commitment and allegiance leading to the formation of cultural communities, alliances, and political groups. In order to investigate this effect on dynamic of social networks, we introduce a temporal kernel function into the Heider’s balance theory, allowing the quality of past relations to contribute to the evolution of system. In this theory, relations between agents are considered as positive/negative links referring to friendship/animosity, profit/nonprofit, etc. This theory proposes a model based on triadic configurations in which relations evolve to reduce the number of unbalanced triads and attain minimum tension states (balanced or jammed states). Considering memory results in the emergence of aged links which measures the aging process of the society. By increasing age of some relations, some nodes become more resist to change their relations, resulting in the formation a skeleton under the skin of society. Even though network’s dynamic gets affected by memory, still the general trend of society dynamics goes towards obtaining stable states. The resistance of aged links against the changes decelerates the evolution of the society and traps it into long-lived frustrated states which can survive in unstable states in contrast to stable configurations.

Biography

Maria Kostoglou holds BA in Archaeology (Aristotle University, Greece), MPhil and PhD. in Mediterranean Archaeology with an expertise in ancient metalwork (University of Glasgow). She worked as curator in national museums and university museums in Britain and abroad. As a lecturer at SOAS she is C-convening the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies, teaches modules on Curating Cultures, Museums and Museology and supervises research students. Previously, she directed the Heritage Studies Programme, taught material culture courses, collections management, and relevant research methods at the University of Manchester; she also developed learning, research, and outreach activities with the humanities collections of the Manchester Museum. She is interested in research and supervision in ancient artefact studies; the materiality of objects and their connections with place and identity (past and present); heritage interpretation (in multi-cultural settings); and developing University Museum collections for higher education learning and research.


Abstract

The study of artefacts is at the core of many disciplines concerned with the study of multiple interactions between people and things. Over the past decades, disciplines as diverse as archaeology, sociology, anthropology, arts and cultures (and histories of) as well as materials science or industrial design, have all been concerned with the lives of objects, their production, use, circulation and meanings amongst people and societies in the past and in the resent (and not so much in the future). The first part of this talk will provide a brief overview of the main theoretical and methodological approaches that have been crucial in shaping our disciplinary understanding of artefacts over the past few decades. The second part is exploring answers to two crucial questions. Firstly: does age matter? In other words: are archaeological objects a bit more special? And secondly: who owns or should own artefacts and artefact collections? The third, and final, part of the presentation will look at issues relating to the future of artefact collections. 

Biography

Charles Okwuwa completed his PhD from University of Abuja in 2010 with specialization in development, after obtaining his M Sc. from University of Ibadan in 1980 in industrial sociology. A former Head of Department, Sociology, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University (IBBU), Lapai (2013-2016), he lectures both undergraduate and post graduate students in the university. Before joining the university in 2012, he rose to the position of Deputy General Manager (Customer Care) in the Nigerian Telecommunications Plc. He edited the Lapai Journal of Sociology (2013-1016) and also served on the Board of Lapai International Journal of Management and Social Sciences for the same period. He has attended many national and international conferences in Africa and America (USA).

 


Abstract

Globally, agricultural production and its associated technologies, through series of age-long interaction and experimentation, have always been the pivot for rural, urban and general socio-economic development. By implication, at least among the Third World countries that includes Nigeria, agriculture, among other sectors and depending on how it is managed, addresses poverty and unemployment challenges. From antiquity till date, Nigeria has practiced agriculture but yet is face with food insecurity, mounting unemployment, poverty and stagnated development. The challenge to social science prompted this empirical research in Lapai community with the aim of interrogating  Nigeria’s agricultural practice, issues and prospects towards widening fact based knowledge for enhanced and beneficial agricultural production. The research relied on both quantitative and qualitative methods and generated data from famers in the locality. Among the findings are that systemic forces of  exclusive governance and its elements of impunity, waste, and leadership failure, among others, stagnate not only agricultural production but also grow poverty, unemployment and general socio-economic development crisis. Respondents identify government and culture as the sources of the country’s failure in agricultural production and related socio-economic problems and also hold the view that realignment of these forces should lead the reconstruction of the country. Respondents view grassroots attention to farmers as key in developing Nigeria. Among the recommendations are strategic inclusiveness of farmers and all stakeholders in agricultural planning and implementation, liberalized extension services to farmers including financing, training and materials like tools and seedlings.

 

 

Location: Armstrong

Biography

Giuseppe Nicastro took master’s degree in Architecture at the University of Florence - DIDA, Department of Architecture, discussing the thesis Digital Survey and Virtual Heritage: the Castellum Aquarum of Poggio Murelle in Manciano (Gr). From 2016 he is PHD student in Survey and representation of Architecture and environment at the University of Florence: he is mainly interested in digital survey technologies (Laser Scanner, Structure from Motion, UAV) and 3D applied to cultural heritage.


Abstract

The Scientific research in the field of surveying and digital representation has now consolidated methodologies that have seen an ever-increasing hybridization with new languages: a more advanced use of 3D to describe an environment has forced us to look more closely at those experiences of digital visual storytelling, such as cinema and videogames, which have long used this multimedia languages. At the same time, the massive diffusion of mobile devices as well as their technological development, gave us the opportunity of reaching an increasing number of users who are confronting today with these technologies. So the virtual reconstruction, based on the data collected during the surveying campaigns, offers the possibility to make interactive simulations and thematic readings of an archaeological site, allowing us to give shape to interpretative and reconstructive hypotheses: the digital reconstructions allow us to display complex information in a more complete visual way to create a communication channel aimed at a wide and diversified audience of users. From these methodological premises the Baratti in 3D digital platform is born, designed to store and display in an interactive way the results of research conducted on the site of Populonia (Piombino – Italy) in recent years. From this point of view, the data collected during the survey become a precious archive to develop an advanced digital reconstruction of this archaeological site. The Baratti in 3D platform offers an interactive environment built using real-time rendering technologies: unlike static rendering engines, dynamic rendering engines allow to program freely explorable 3D environments equipped with dynamic lighting systems, management of physics in real time and the possibility of adapting the user control systems to different types of devices (laptops, smartphone, tablet, etc.).

Biography

J. Daguebert has completed her Master’s thesis from Rennes 1 University in archaeological sciences with seven other trains about geology, environment, and history of art, legal study, the heritage by the feels, Egyptology and army. From her Master’s thesis subjects (the protohistoric boats for Yorkshire - Lincolnshire, following the protohistoric textiles and dyes for the French Atlantic area), she became an archaeologist multipurpose in ten years for several companies and museums in France and UK. As well as, by her laboratory ArtKéo’N’Stone, she’s voluntary archaeological analyst and site assistant for the N.E.H.H.A.S archaeological company (Hampshire UK) and for the voluntary archaeological research section Les Caligae d’Hermès ASCEE 05 association (Hautes-Alpes), for which she participates at the roman road projects. During four years, as archaeological and historical art professor, she trained her students in Université du Temps Libre and like reference professor for students in university which distribute diploma.  


Abstract

Lot of archaeological sites are directed according to celestial bodies, according to their effects on the Earth, as well as their impacts on the human behaviour towards their environment, especially throughout the Neolithic and metal age thanks to the megaliths and artefacts in relationship with the sun and the moon. The archaeoastronomy study is used to understand the ancestral worship to measure the time for the pastoral and the ritual activities. A fortuitous discovery in August 2015 made in the Alpes de Haute Provence by voluntary archaeological association GAPS awakened a renewed interest for the Blanche valley’s archaeology. A feminine statuette was found around a loch nearby two glacial tills carved of a lunar timetable graduated, stars and cupula; dated 3500 BC by the prehistorian J.Courtin. The first approach caught our attention for its particularities attached to an observatory, for the fertility cult, for the fact it has never been registered as a monument and because since other sites appeared in its surroundings. The palaeoecological rapport by Natura 2000 tells three dates of human occupation: 4500-3500 BC keeps up a correspondence with the astronomical devotion and confirms the date estimated, 970 BC really short with no pertinent evidence, for medieval age the loch was brought into play for the textile manufacture, date not kept. The statuette is anchored in the prehistoric statue tradition, here with two triangular forms and two crescent forms, its fourth faces match up the principal fourth moon faces, which reveal with the calendar a mathematic system to rhythm the agricultural bustles instead of the cup-marked stones, which reveal a cult during the Taurus constellation era, could be the sky chart. In the south-east French Alpes Mountain, this site shows the motion of use of the rocs putting them in line with the belief about water and the sky.

Biography

Stefano Rossi completed his degree (Prehistoric Archaeology) in 1993 and Special School of Archaeology (Prehistory and Proto-history) in 2000 at University of Florence, and several Masters. He is member of IIPP (Italian Institute of Prehistory), Accademia Etrusca di Cortona and ICOM. He founded and works for a private society (Aion Cultura) from 1995 in Cortona (Arezzo), for which he is the coordinator of archaeological projects. He is active mainly at Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e ella Città di Cortona – MAEC, in which is responsable of the managing for archaeological sector. He is involved daily with educational in museums and communication with a large audience. His research area is Bronze Age, Etruscans, Excavations, Educational, Museums, Exhibitions, Relations between contemporaneity and ancient world. He dug about 50 excavations, most of them as coordinator or director. He has published more than 20 scientific papers and popular books. He gave several lectures for different Universities.

 


Abstract

As we know since ancient time’s historians wondered where Etruscans came from. The answers can be summarized in:
-  Etruscans came from Lydia (Asia Minor), by Herodotus (Vcent.B.C.)
- Autoctonous origin, by Dionysius of Halicarnassus, I cent.B.C., the Etruscans came from the previous prehistoric populations in Central Italy -  Etruscans from Northern Italy (by​ a quote of Tito Livio), developed in ‘800 and 900,by Freret and Niebuhr, for Raethians, descended from Etruscans, The discussion of the origin of Etruscans lasted until today, but there no scientific proof to confirm the validity of single theories, neither recent DNA studies gave a solution.We confirm what M.Pallottino wrote: the question was incorrectly placed, looking for a definitive solution, without considering several aspects.We can sustain that the proper historian population of Etruscans (from VIII cent.B.C.) came certainly from Etruria, directly from Villanovian and Protovillanovian (XII-IXcent.) for a production of Etruscan pottery is the clear consequence of the black pottery of Villanovians and Final Bronze. Neverthless we know a conflictive period in XIII cent.B.C., witnesses to a profound social and demographic change throughout Mediterranean, with vast migrations of populations, probably connected with a general crisis (that should make us reflect on the similarities with XXI century); the unresolved fall of Myceneans, the invasion of Sea People in Egypt, the same through the Central Anatolia with the collapse of Hittites, and the great eruption of Thera. The same aspects which brought indeed in Italy great changes, a passage during the end of MBA, from well-developed culture to a global impoverishment, in North from Terramare to next FBA cultures with a cremation tradition, the same in Central Italy with the end of the Appenninic culture towards a FBA which will lead in direction to another society, and later to the formation of the city.

 

Biography

Stefano Rossi completed his degree (Prehistoric Archaeology) in 1993 and Special School of Archaeology (Prehistory and Proto-history) in 2000 at University of Florence, and several Masters. He is member of IIPP (Italian Institute of Prehistory), Accademia Etrusca di Cortona and ICOM. He founded and works for a private society (Aion Cultura) from 1995 in Cortona (Arezzo), for which he is the coordinator of archaeological projects. He is active mainly at Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e ella Città di Cortona – MAEC, in which is responsable of the managing for archaeological sector. He is involved daily with educational in museums and communication with a large audience. His research area is Bronze Age, Etruscans, Excavations, Educational, Museums, Exhibitions, Relations  between contemporaneity and ancient world. He dug about 50 excavations, most of them as coordinator or director. He has published more than 20 scientific papers and popular books. He gave several lectures for different Universities.


Abstract

In 2014 I proposed to start a project of a new approach to archeology and stratigraphical excavation as a research method in Cortona (AR) thanks to experimental and simulative archaeology. The idea is to understand if it is possible to investigate our contemporary society through material culture and our methods of study like stratigraphical research and excavation. If, during an excavation, we can find a context of objects in different raw materials, and these ones show us a general reading of the circumstances why those findings are in such environment, we are in the right direction. And of course we the chance to know that context in advance because it is contemporary and therefore already acquired by direct knowledge. Then we can directly check the veracity of the conclusions of our archaeological research. The same if we collect a series of objects of the same category and make a classification of them in a typological catalog, will they tell us the truth? Moreover, this “experiment” would finally confirm the scientific nature of archaeological research. Finally in 2018, to achieve this test we have set up at Parco archeologico del Sodo in Cortona (AR) an experimental archaelogical field where to dig contemporary layers.  A first group used some students of secondary school involved in a simulated excavation lesson, to verify which kind of situation, stratigraphy and objects we could find and then to draw conclusions to proceed further. The results were so interesting to encourage us to continue on this direction and to expand our investigation on several fronts. Another group will be engaged in the classification of some classes of materials, such as bottles, to try to define a cultural aspect of the contemporaneity.

Biography

Stefano Rossi completed his degree (Prehistoric Archaeology) in 1993 and Special School of Archaeology (Prehistory and Proto-history) in 2000 at University of Florence, and several Masters. He is member of IIPP (Italian Institute of Prehistory), Accademia Etrusca di Cortona and ICOM. He founded and works for a private society (Aion Cultura) from 1995 in Cortona (Arezzo), for which he is the coordinator of archaeological projects. He is active mainly at Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e ella Città di Cortona – MAEC, in which is responsable of the managing for archaeological sector. He is involved daily with educational in museums and communication with a large audience. His research area is Bronze Age, Etruscans, Excavations, Educational, Museums, Exhibitions, Relations  between contemporaneity and ancient world. He dug about 50 excavations, most of them as coordinator or director. He has published more than 20 scientific papers and popular books. He gave several lectures for different Universities.


Abstract

In these years our society tries to carry on a new point of view to develop an interaction between contemporaneity and antiquities, archaeology with contemporary art to show that man is always the same, Homo sapiens, his brain has not changed since the beginning of Upper Paleolithic and reacts in the same way to the problems the environment induces, often elaborating the same solutions or the same expressions. According to this aim we are introducing several initiatives together some museum institutions including a series of art exhibitions and conferences about relationship between topics of the museums and the point of view of an artist about these. Thus we started with an exhibition made in 2018 at MAEC – Archaeological Museum in Cortona and in MANN –Archaeological Museum of Naples, of a photographer, Aldo Palazzolo from Sicily, and which is considered by the critics one of the most important portraitist in contemporary author-photography, using his works in relationship with the content of the museums with: some portraits overlapping ancient statuary, a work concerning light in marble sculptures, furthermore some composed traces of Egyptian culture, in a continuous reference to the forms of antiquity.

And nextly in MANN:

-another exhibition of an American photographer, Susannah Hays, Prof. in Fine Arts at University of Georgia, whose work is focused on objects and their cultural meanings, or degrading landscapes like in different archaeological layers.

- a conference about Domenico Cimarosa, the famous 18th cent. neapolitain opera composer, carried out by dr. Simone Perugini (DAMS Univerdity of Florence) with the participation of M.° Riccardo Muti.

- a commemoration of the famous Naples journalist Luigi Necco, very famous in Italy for his works in RaiTv, who produced archaeological documentaries about Pompei, Near East, mostly on Mesopotamia and Egypt which we’ll present in MANN on June 2019.

Biography

Stefano Rossi completed his degree (Prehistoric Archaeology) in 1993 and Special School of Archaeology (Prehistory and Proto-history) in 2000 at University of Florence, and several Masters. He is member of IIPP (Italian Institute of Prehistory), Accademia Etrusca di Cortona and ICOM. He founded and works for a private society (Aion Cultura) from 1995 in Cortona (Arezzo), for which he is the coordinator of archaeological projects. He is active mainly at Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e ella Città di Cortona – MAEC, in which is responsable of the managing for archaeological sector. He is involved daily with educational in museums and communication with a large audience. His research area is Bronze Age, Etruscans, Excavations, Educational, Museums, Exhibitions, Relations  between contemporaneity and ancient world. He dug about 50 excavations, most of them as coordinator or director. He has published more than 20 scientific papers and popular books. He gave several lectures for different Universities.

 


Abstract

Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e della Città di Cortona (AR) in Tuscany (Italy) presents a remarkable archaeological collection concerning  Etruscans and particularly findings from local Tumulus of archaic period (VIcent.B.C.). Our society (AION Cultura) manages museum’s educational activities and extended its projects involving disadvantaged people in every categories.

At first we developed a path inside the museum for blind and visually impaired people :

1 - through the implementation of panels and captions in Braille alphabet and an optional support in a short Braille bookguide

2 – through the realization of models or copies of findings so that a blind can easily “see” and understand by touching them

3 – with guided tour for them thanks internal cultural guides, trained to make individual special tours for blind by National Blind Association of Florence

4 – with specialised researcher we created an olfactory –sensorial path in the Parco Archeologico del Sodo in Cortona through the execution of several olfactory stations with different essences and perfumes of the vegetation present in Etruscan times

All this was possible for our participation in an European Project in 2002 with Comune di Cortona together with France (Paris) about disabilities and our formation allowed us to propose this experience to other museums like Museo della Preistoria del Monte Cetona (Siena) and Museo Fiorentino di Preistoria, Florence with a project called “Forbidden not to touch” Moreover we continued this program with other kinds of disabilities and we can organize guided tour in the museum for people with mental desease in collaboration with local associations for mental health aid as CAM Association in  Cortona.Furthermore in 2018 with Comune di Cortona we start a project of hospitality for immigrants coming from Africa, involving them to make an intercultural garden to treat the main original plants and essences in Parco Archeologico del Sodo.

 

Biography

Ogechi Ibeanusi has completed her BA in history at the age of 22 years from the University of Southern California. She is the career awareness program coordinator of Beacon Aptos Middle School CYCSF program, a premier middle school college and career service organization. She will present up to five academic presentations in the following year. 


Abstract

In my presentation, I will discuss Rene Girard’s theory of mimesis and the scapegoating function of Christianity. In Girard’s theory of religion and culture, he offers what he calls to be the science of humanity that can answer the questions surrounding the origins of culture and religion. The components that comprise of these theories are mimetic desire and violence, the second being the scapegoat, the third is religious awe, and finally the Bible and the revelation of Jesus Christ. Girard differentiates mimetic desire with imitation in that imitation is copying while mimetic desire functions as a triangle with subject, object, and mediator. Furthermore, violence is added because mimetic desire unlike imitation later leads to rivalry over object desire. Thus, the mediator becomes both the model and obstacle and mimetic desire intensifies rivalries, which Girard believes early modern societies experienced paroxym. This explains the situation in which human beings revert to the Freudian death instinct, which eventually leads to a single victim or outsider on the margins, whom the community thrusts their bane upon and blames for the problems apparent in all members of the community (otherwise known as the scapegoat.) After the scapegoat has been sacrificed, the community begins to experience greater peace and deifies the scapegoat as a god. The act of killing the scapegoat becomes holy and is at the center of Christ’s crucification on the cross and Christian-Judeo culture. In my presentation, I will discuss the importance of Girard’s theory of the scapegoat mechanism on Christianity today and the socio-political implications it has had on marginalized groups today. I will also discuss how the scapegoating function of Christianity completes the need for atonement of the global community’s sin by both canceling the bane and reviving the peace needed for the community to thrive.